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Jim Hoorman - Enhancing Mycorrhizae And Metarhizium Fungus
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Mycorrhizae fungus enhance plant nutrient in our agricultural crops and also perform many other functions including improving macroaggregates, disease suppression, improving soil porosity and water drainage, and improving drought resistance.  Mycorrhizae fungi bring back 6X more phosphorus and many other micronutrients than the plant root can by itself.  Corn roots can explore only about 1% of the soil volume but with the aid of mycorrhizae, they can explore up to 20% of the soil volume for water and nutrients.  Metarhizium fungi kill over 200 insect species but also enhance nitrogen uptake in the plant. 
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"Soil is meant to be covered..."
Jim Hoorman Speaks about Cover Crops
in Soil Health Series Live Streamin

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"Soil is meant to be covered" said Hoorman. "Each cover crop is designed for a special purpose. Legume cover crops, for instance, are typically used to produce homegrown nitrogen. Grass cover crops are used to increase soil organic matter, recycle excess nutrients, and reduce soil compaction. Brassica covers are grown to loosen the soil, recycle nutrients and suppress weeds and plant pathogens. Other covers are grown to suppress harmful insects or attract beneficial insects".

The interview featured most common questions farmers may have about cover crops, such as: What are the most popular species of cover crops in our region? When can cover crops be planted? What species do best at what time of year planting? What are ways to terminate cover crops? and What are sources of cover crop seeds?
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Unlocking the Secrets of the Soil: Science of Soil Health:
Compaction

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What's the best way to restore compacted soil? Cover crops.  Cover crops and crop roots add soil organic matter (SOM) and root exudates which improve soil structure.  The majority of SOM comes from plant roots which add soil porosity and add carbon to our soils.  Carbon is the storehouse for soil nutrients. 
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Unlocking the Secrets of the Soil: Science of Soil Health:
Plants Feed the Soil Organisms and Vice Versa

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Plants feed soil organisms and they feed the plants.  Plant roots use 25 to 45% of their total carbohydrate root reserves to feed soil microbes.  The microbes use that energy in the form of sugars to bring back water and soluble nutrients to feed the plant.  Each microbe is just a soluble bag of fertilizer to feed the plant.  There is roughly 1,000 to 2,000X more microbes around plant roots than there is in the bulk soil without plant roots. 
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Environmental Impacts of Cover Crops - Jim Hoorman
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Cover Crops have a huge effect on soil properties and how soluble nutrients are stored in the soil.  Phosphorus in Lake Erie is causing eutrophication and harmful algal blooms (HAB).  Cover crops roots increase water infiltration, tie up soluble nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus, and build up soil organic matter.  Cover crops tie up P in the organic form which is plant available but plant roots also influence the inorganic forms (aluminum, iron, calcium, magnesium) forms which are not plant available.  Too much tillage and a lack of plant roots cause anerobic (lack of oxygen) and saturated soil conditions which allows ferric iron (Fe3+ reddish pink soil) to convert to ferrous iron (Fe2+ blue-gray soil) releasing soluble reactive phosphorus to surface water.
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Biology of Soil Compaction Webinar March 2014
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This national webinar shows how soil compaction is a biological problem related to a lack of roots in the soil profile and poor soil structure.  Plant roots form macroaggregates which allows the soil to have more porosity and improve soil structure.  Tillage destroys soil structure and turns soil into cement.
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South Dakota March 2013 Dakota:  Biology of Soil Compaction
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Similar video showing how soil compaction is a biological problem related to a lack of roots in the soil profile and poor soil structure.  Plant roots form macroaggregates which allows the soil to have more porosity and improve soil structure.  Tillage destroys soil structure and turns soil into cement.
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ECO Farming: A New Farming System for the 21st Century
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This short clip was produced in 2011 at a field day in Mercer County Ohio.  Jim Hoorman, Ray Archuleta, Dave Brandt, and Jeff Rasawehr talk about a new concept call ECO Farming.  The idea was to do 1) Eternal No-till 2) Cover crops and 3) Other best management practices to improve soil structure, feed the plant, and reduce water and nutrient runoff in Grand Lake St. Marys